Archive for the 'Sports Media' Category

From The Accomplishment Department

Joe Morgan graced ESPN’s SportsNation with his most idiotic chat of the season today. I’ll have more later, but enjoy this nugget. It’s quite an accomplishment.

Cody (Minneapolis): Its possible that the Twins could have the AL Cy Young winner, the AL batting champ and the AL MVP. Has that ever happened before?

SportsNation Joe Morgan: That’s a great question. I’m not sure if it’s ever happened before. It would be a great accomplishment. I’m not sure if it ever happened before, but it could have happened a different way with a pitcher winning the Cy Young and MVP with a batting title, but I’m not sure about three different players. That would be quite an accomplishment.

Many in media misconstruing Moneyball

This off-season, the Moneyball backlash has been in full swing. From the White Sox supposed small ball approach to the game to the disastrous firing of Paul DePodesta in Los Angeles, pundits have been haring on the downfall of the theories espoused in Michael Lewis’ controversial and influential book.

There’s only one problem: These writers are wrong.

This week, Murray Chass, a venerable columnist for The New York Times who is generally on top of the game, wrote anti-Moneyball column. Entitled “When ‘Moneyball’ No Longer Pays Off,” Chass’ column completely misses the mark.

First, he bemoans the Athletics’ recent playoff misses. Under Art Howe, the anti-Moneyball manager, the team made the playoffs, but under Ken Macha, Chass notes, they’ve missed the postseason for the past two seasons. Maybe it was Howe and not GM Billy Beane, the key character of Lewis’ book, Chass theorizes. Then, he criticizes Kevin Youkilis, a key player in Moneyball, for not showing the Red Sox that he can contribute on a daily basis. Finally, he dumps on DePodesta and J.P. Ricciardi, two Beane disciples who have not yet overseen success on the field.

I’m going to dissect Chass’ claims backwards. Ricciardi, the Blue Jays GM, does not deserve the scorn heaped on him by Chass. Ricciardi is competing against the Yankees and the Red Sox. No amount of statistical analysis would allow him to match the funds available to these two teams. He’s put together a decent offensive team in light of these challenges, and 2006 will be the biggest test so far for the Blue Jays. Don’t write him off just yet.

The Dodgers were an utter disaster, but that’s not because of DePodesta. DePodesta developed a strong farm system and tried to put together a competitive team. But injuries left the Dodgers struggling to find suitable Major Leaguers for much of the season. While the LA media – and Bill Plaschke in particular – drove DePodesta out of town on a rail, it’s hard to blame the Dodgers’ 22-game slide on DePodesta unless he personally injured each of his high-priced players. Yet, Chass conveniently overlooks this fact.

Kevin Youkilis, the Greek (Jewish) God of Walks as dubbed by Beane, has a career OBP of .376 and just 345 plate appearances in two big league seasons. He will be 27 on opening day, and the only reason he hasn’t show the Red Sox he can contribute on a daily basis is because the Red Sox have yet to give him a chance to play on a daily basis. Again, Chass omits this distinction.

And then, finally, we arrive back at the crux of his column: an unfounded attack on the Oakland Athletics that completely and utterly misses the point of Moneyball. Chass wants to assess the success of Moneyball by analyzing the A’s postseason successes. He’s choosing to highlight the extreme limits of Moneyball success at the cost of a real analysis of the ideas set forth by Beane in Lewis’ book.

The success of a team following the Moneyball approach should not be determined by postseason appearances or postseason victories or World Championships. This point is often glossed over by those who do not subscribe to the Moneyball view and see the Red Sox as pursuing a Moneyball approach similar to that of the A’s. That is a gross mischaracterization.

Moneyball is about using performance evaluation metrics in order to find players who can help your team remain competitive while keeping payroll within fairly tight constraints. It’s about taking a chance on low-risk, high-yield investments that could help propel your team into a pennant race while competing against teams with better finances and a higher payroll.

People point to the A’s 2005 season as a clear sign of Moneyball failure. I take the other approach: The 2005 season vindicated, yet again, the Moneyball approach to low-payroll team construction.

In 2005, the Oakland Athletics had a payroll of $55 million, ranking them 21st in all of baseball. The Angels of Wherever, their competitors and eventual AL West champions, had a payroll of $95 million, fifth highest in baseball. While the A’s fell short of the playoffs, as late as September 20, they were 1.5 games behind the Angels.

The fact that the A’s, a team with 57 percent of the financial resources of the Angels, could even turn this ridiculous financial situation into a playoff race speaks volumes of the Moneyball success to team construction. Furthermore, the A’s actually outscored the Angels. The Moneyball offense built around OBP was better than the Angels’ high-priced star-studded lineup.

So then where do the A’s and Dodgers and Blue Jays, teams run by so-called Moneyball disciples, develop this bad reputation? I believe it stems from the success of high-profile teams that rely on statistical analysis.

Take the Red Sox and to a lesser extent the Yankees. These two teams clearly worship at the altar of OBP (and the altar of deep pockets). The Red Sox have been able to integrate statistical analysis into their draft and advanced scouting. When team management combines rigorous performance analysis with deep pockets, it is possible to produce a perennial winner.

When columnists see the Red Sox and the A’s square off, they tend to look past the fact that the Red Sox have a payroll that is more than twice that of the A’s. Rather, they see two teams on even playing fields that both employ statistical analysis. But for some unknown reason, what works for the Red Sox doesn’t work as well for the A’s. And I’ll be damned if Billy Beane isn’t the one shouldering the blame for that season after season.

In an era of payroll disparity, the A’s have remained competitive year after year in the face of overwhelming odds. That is the success of Moneyball.

Voting for baseball honors, ‘Ron Mexico’ test ethics of sports coverage

What happens when the number one sports network in the country with a multi-billion-dollar contract with the NFL has to cover an embarrassing sex scandal? What happens when a baseball writer has to vote for the Hall of Fame or off-season awards but the players on the ballot are those he’s covered for years or maybe even decades?

These both are questions that sportswriters and sports news organizations such as ESPN have to face these days, and in the post-Jayson Blair era, their response or lack thereof speak volumes about the current state of journalistic ethics in sports coverage.

The Strange Case of Ron Mexico, Star Quarterback
Today, at the popular sports commentary site Deadspin, Will Leitch took a jab at himself and ESPN. In reviewing his year-end, month-by-month recaps, he noticed he had left out a sex scandal in April that most sports fans have seemingly forgotten. This scandal focused around Falcons quarterback Michael Vick.

In April, a woman sued Vick, claiming the football player knew he had herpes and knowingly gave her the disease without telling her. The twist to this story, though, was that Vick, to hide from his disease public, used the psuedonym Ron Mexico during his treatment. In fact, Ron Mexico is Vick’s alias on the lawsuit at The Smoking Gun. In writing about the Ron Mexico escapades, Leitch had this to say:

It was the perfect example of how sports media was hiding the best stories from us. ESPN, because of its contract with the NFL (Vick was/is one of the league’s most marketable players), completely buried the Ron Mexico story (the only place you can find a reference to Ron Mexico on the site is on the message boards), and just a month after the story broke, Sports Illustrated did a cover story on Vick without a single mention of the lawsuit, or Ron Mexico, or anything. It was the single most entertaining story of the first six months of the sports year, and the major sports media outlets just weren’t covering it.

While Leitch’s comments carry the tone of witty introspection, the facts tell a more serious story for those of us interested in ethics in journalism. As Leitch writes, Sports Illustrated and ESPN did not cover the story. To rub it in, ESPN.com’s Page 2 year-end look at sex and sports did not give a single mention to the Ron Mexico/Michael Vick sex story. In fact, the only reason this story ever garnered a mention in most news outlets was because the NFL had to crack down on fans who were trying to buy customized Ron Mexico jerseys as a joke.

So why didn’t ESPN cover the story? Was it because a hard-hitting news piece on this story would damage the reputation of one of the NFL’s most marketable players? Would it impact the current $4.8 billion deal ESPN has in place with the NFL? Personally, I don’t have the answers to any of these questions. But how can an organization that purports to be the leading sports news media outlet both online and on television adequately cover an organization to which it has such close financial ties?

In an era in which The New York Times has opened up the newsroom to a public editor, it’s time for ESPN to do some journalistic soul searching. Their ombudsman, who most people probably do not even realize exists, is George Solomon. He’s written a grand total of six columns for worldwide leader in sports since July. Either ESPN is the paragon of sports journalism, or Solomon isn’t being encouraged to dig too deeply.

The problem here is also matter of antipathy. Do sports fan care that much or do they just want sports without the news? In a bitterly-divided nation with Republicans and Democrats at each other throats and political blogging showing the potential to force major media changes, it makes sense that so many major newspapers are opening up their Section A news gathering protocols and political coverage to public editors tasked with critiquing the system and liaisoning with the readership. But sports critiques have been strangely missing from the mouths of these editors. I wonder if sports fans just don’t care. We should.

Abstaining from Awards Voting
While ESPN, an entertainment and sports network, tries to straddle the divide between news, sports, and entertainment, on the other side of this ethics debate are many print outlets who are barring their writers from voting in the annual baseball awards and Hall of Fame elections. But are they going far enough?

On Friday, San Diego Union-Tribune columnist Tim Sullivan announced his intention to abstain from further voting as it represented to him a clear conflict of interest. Here’s a lengthy excerpt of Sullivan’s piece:

I’ve concluded that it’s time to get back to being a detached observer and away from being an involved insider…Voting on awards or rankings is a privilege and, to some extent, a power base, but it also involves inherent conflicts of interest and, in the steroids era, an uncomfortable reliance on circumstantial evidence…I shouldn’t be casting ballots that can trigger contractual bonuses or endorsement opportunities for athletes I might have occasion to interview. Neither should I accept the responsibility of deciding whether Mark McGwire is still entitled to the presumption of innocence following his clumsy evasions before Congress…Better to recuse oneself than to render a judgment based on unsubstantiated suspicion. Better to stick to the sidelines than to get in a game in which you never really belonged.

Sullivan’s piece provides a rare glimpse into the world of sportswriting. Are these beat writers who are around the players from the start of Spring Training through the end of October the most objective arbiters? Can they put aside the mantle of involved insider while casting an MVP vote for someone they may spend more time around then their families? To me, it seems that the institution of baseball writers so prevalent in this nation is pushing up against that boundary line, and I applaud Sullivan for coming public with his misgivings about voting.

Sullivan is hardly a leader in this regard. In fact, many institutions ban their writers from voting for certain awards. Already, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Baltimore Sun, Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Washington Post, and the Associated Press do not allow non-critics to vote for awards, whether these awards be film polls or MVP ballots. While these prestigious institutions may lead the way, having six papers and a columnist on board hardly counts as a revolution in ethics.

Nowhere better will this ethics drama play itself out than in the upcoming Hall of Fame voting. Hardly the darling of the media, Albert Belle is up for Hall of Fame election. By most accounts, he should be a first ballot Hall of Famer. While a corked bat incident is a black mark on his reputation, Belle was downright dominant throughout the 1990s. His 50-50 season came during the strike-shortened year of 1995. He had nine straight 100+ RBI seasons and would probably still be playing today had a degenerative hip condition not ended his career at age 33. Furthermore, Belle had an arguably better career than Kirby Puckett, a Hall of Famer whose career was also cut short due to an injury.

But Belle might not make it to the Hall because he didn’t have a rosy relationship with the reporters voting for him. He threw bats; he punched photographers. He was mean. Puckett, on the other hand, despite marital troubles off the field, was always viewed as the nice guy on the Twins. While Belle couldn’t leave his intensity between the foul lines, Puckett won over the guys who would eventually vote him into Cooperstown. So now the conflict of interest becomes apparent: How can you objectively vote for a player who hated the media and whom the media loved to hate?

As political coverage in the media has to contend with intense scrutiny from the Internet, sportswriters will eventually have to face their ethical demons. For now, sports fans are left with the Ron Mexico name-generator (I’m Xavier Botswana) and an upcoming Hall of Fame election sure to be one of the more controversial. It’s time for sports news outlets to take that ethical leap forward. Hopefully, public editors can give sports news operations the proper examination. Maybe we will find out why no news organization broke a steroid story that could not have been a secret to reporters with nearly limitless access to locker rooms, and maybe we will see a better framework for awards voting. These steps forward would be most welcome by this sports fan.


RSS River Ave. Blues

  • Yanks can’t cash in with runners on base, lose 2-1 to Pirates April 24, 2017
    Source: FanGraphs Well, that game could have gone a lot better. Jordan Montgomery didn’t have the best showing but limited the damage to 2 runs in 6 IP, which is pretty solid. Bryan Mitchell got out of a no-out, bases-loaded jam and tossed another scoreless to keep the Yankees close, but the offense went silent […] The post Yanks can’t cash in with runners o […]
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  • DotF: Gregorius continues rehab assignment in Tampa’s loss April 24, 2017
    The Yankees announced their first notable prospect promotion of the season earlier today: RHP Albert Abreu has been bumped up from Low-A Charleston to High-A Tampa. The team’s No. 9 prospect had a 1.84 ERA (2.54 FIP) with 22 strikeouts and three walks in three outings and 14.2 innings with the RiverDogs. Abreu, who came […] The post DotF: Gregorius continues […]
    Mike Axisa
  • Sunday Open Thread April 23, 2017
    Your browser does not support iframes.Here is an open thread for the rest of the weekend. The Mets and Nationals are the ESPN Sunday Night Game (Wheeler vs. Scherzer), plus there’s a whole bunch of NBA and NHL playoff games on throughout the afternoon and evening. Talk about those games, this afternoon’s loss, or anything […] The post Sunday Open Thread appe […]
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  • Game 18: Nova vs. Nova’s replacement April 23, 2017
    This afternoon’s series finale against the Pirates features a matchup of last year’s fifth starter and this year’s fifth starter. Well, technically Ivan Nova opened last season in the bullpen, but it didn’t take long for him to return to the rotation. Jordan Montgomery started this season in the minors, and like Nova last year, […] The post Game 18: Nova vs. […]
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  • Judging from the Start April 23, 2017
    Aaron Judge, huh? Okay, guys, thanks for reading! Check back next week for…something else…and enjoy whatever show Judge’s gonna put on for the next week. Despite Chase Headley‘s heroics and Starlin Castro‘s hot start, the hands-down, no doubt about it, bonafide best thing about the Yankees in April of 2017 has been Aaron Judge. He’s […] The post Judging from […]
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  • DotF: Frazier homers, Gregorius continues rehab assignment April 23, 2017
    OF Blake Rutherford made SportsCenter’s top ten plays yesterday. He flipped over the wall making a catch in foul territory. The video is above. Hopefully that’s not the last time we see Rutherford on the top ten, eh? Triple-A Scranton (1-0 win over Indianapolis) SS Tyler Wade: 0-4, 1 BB — in a little 1-for-15 […] The post DotF: Frazier homers, Gregorius cont […]
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  • Carter’s clutch homer helps Yanks to an 11-5 win over Pirates April 22, 2017
    Source: FanGraphs Well that was a wild one, huh? Look at that win probability graph up there. The Yankees went from being no-hit in the fifth inning to having two five-run innings by the eighth. The end result was an 11-5 win over the Pirates in the middle game of the series. It’s Saturday, so […] The post Carter’s clutch homer helps Yanks to an 11-5 win ove […]
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  • Game 17: Still no DH April 22, 2017
    Four days ago the Yankees lost to the White Sox to snap their eight-game winning streak. They rebounded the next day with a blowout win. Last night the Yankees dropped the series opener to the Pirates due in part to some sloppy defense. How will they rebound today? Hopefully with another blowout win. That’ll be […] The post Game 17: Still no DH appeared firs […]
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  • Saturday Links: Top 50 Prospects, Cabrera, Forbes, Uniforms April 22, 2017
    The Yankees and Pirates will resume their three-game series with the middle game later this afternoon. Until then, here are a few bits of news and notes to check out. Three Yankees on Law’s updated top 50 prospects list I missed this last week, but Keith Law (subs. req’d) posted an updated list of the […] The post Saturday Links: Top 50 Prospects, Cabrera, F […]
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  • Bad pitching, bad defense send Yankees to 6-3 loss to Pirates April 22, 2017
    Source: FanGraphs Blah, that was a clunker of a series opener. A little of this (bad pitching), a little of that (bad defense), and a little of everything in between (0-for-7 with runners in scoring position) sent the Yankees to a 6-3 loss to the Pirates in Friday night’s series opener. Have I mentioned I […] The post Bad pitching, bad defense send Yankees t […]
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